"In regard to propaganda the early advocates of universal literacy and a free press envisaged only two possibilities: the propaganda might be true, or it might be false. They did not foresee what in fact has happened, above all in our Western capitalist democracies-the development of a vast mass communications industry, concerned in the main neither with the true nor the false, but with the unreal, the more or less totally irrelevant. In a word, they failed to take into account man’s almost infinite appetite for distractions."
-Aldous Huxley, Brave New World Revisited, 1958

"In regard to propaganda the early advocates of universal literacy and a free press envisaged only two possibilities: the propaganda might be true, or it might be false. They did not foresee what in fact has happened, above all in our Western capitalist democracies-the development of a vast mass communications industry, concerned in the main neither with the true nor the false, but with the unreal, the more or less totally irrelevant. In a word, they failed to take into account man’s almost infinite appetite for distractions."

-Aldous Huxley, Brave New World Revisited, 1958

explore-blog:

An interesting look at how much various American cities spent on books as gifts this holiday season. 

explore-blog:

An interesting look at how much various American cities spent on books as gifts this holiday season. 

(Source: explore-blog)

Reality: Two Views
At the close of World War II Picasso is said to have been confronted by an American soldier who complained that he could not understand Picasso’s paintings because everything was distorted; the eyes were displaced, the nose in an odd place, the mouth twisted beyond recognition, and so on. “And what do you think a picture should look like?” asked Picasso. The G.I. proudly whipped out his wallet and showed a tiny photograph of his girlfriend: “Like this!” Picasso studied the photograph and said, “She’s kind of small, isn’t she?”

– taken from Robert L. Solso’s The Psychology of Art and the Evolution of the Conscious Brain

Reality: Two Views
At the close of World War II Picasso is said to have been confronted by an American soldier who complained that he could not understand Picasso’s paintings because everything was distorted; the eyes were displaced, the nose in an odd place, the mouth twisted beyond recognition, and so on. “And what do you think a picture should look like?” asked Picasso. The G.I. proudly whipped out his wallet and showed a tiny photograph of his girlfriend: “Like this!” Picasso studied the photograph and said, “She’s kind of small, isn’t she?”

– taken from Robert L. Solso’s The Psychology of Art and the Evolution of the Conscious Brain

"While reflection, cognition, and interpretation of art are all enhanced through our memory for past experiences and subjective logic, it is the intrinsic structure of the brain that provides the canvas on which perceptions are painted… Art and science contribute to this magnificent process, each providing its own view of what the world is, each telling its truth about a single reality."
- The Psychology of Art and the Evolution of the Conscious Brain by Robert L. Solso

"While reflection, cognition, and interpretation of art are all enhanced through our memory for past experiences and subjective logic, it is the intrinsic structure of the brain that provides the canvas on which perceptions are painted… Art and science contribute to this magnificent process, each providing its own view of what the world is, each telling its truth about a single reality."

- The Psychology of Art and the Evolution of the Conscious Brain by Robert L. Solso

"We have confused knowing more with knowing better. The exponential growth of scientific knowledge made possible by trading breadth for depth is accompanied by the exponential growth of ignorance of how all scientific findings fit together into one known reality."

— Our War on Ourselves: Rethinking Science, Technology, and Economic Growth (p. 58) by Willem H. Vanderburg

literaryjukebox:

I will never be a brain surgeon, and I will never play the piano like Glenn Gould.

But what keeps me up late at night, and constantly gives me reason to fret, is this: I don’t know what I don’t know. There are universes of things out there — ideas, philosophies, songs, subtleties, facts, emotions — that exist but of which I am totally and thoroughly unaware. This makes me very uncomfortable. I find that the only way to find out the fuller extent of what I don’t know is for someone to tell me, teach me or show me, and then open my eyes to this bit of information, knowledge, or life experience that I, sadly, never before considered.

Afterward, I find something odd happens. I find what I have just learned is suddenly everywhere: on billboards or in the newspaper or SMACK: Right in front of me, and I can’t help but shake my head and speculate how and why I never saw or knew this particular thing before. And I begin to wonder if I could be any different, smarter, or more interesting had I discovered it when everyone else in the world found out about this particular obvious thing. I have been thinking a lot about these first discoveries and also those chance encounters: those elusive happenstances that often lead to defining moments in our lives.

[…]

I once read that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results. I fundamentally disagree with this idea. I think that doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results is the definition of hope. We might keep making mistakes but the struggle gives us a sense of empathy and connectivity that we would not experience otherwise. I believe this empathy improves our ability to see the unseen and better know the unknown.

Lives are shaped by chance encounters and by discovering things that we don’t know that we don’t know. The arc of a life is a circuitous one. … In the grand scheme of things, everything we do is an experiment, the outcome of which is unknown.

You never know when a typical life will be anything but, and you won’t know if you are rewriting history, or rewriting the future, until the writing is complete.

This, just this, I am comfortable not knowing.

Song: “Mystery” by Beth Orton

iTunes :: Amazon :: Back to Brain Pickings

libraryjournal:

chicagopubliclibrary:


“Everyone you will ever meet knows something you don’t.”

Happy birthday, Bill Nye! Born November 27th, 1955.
The Chicago Public Library has a large selection of Bill Nye books. Click here to check out the list.

This is just great life advice. Happy birthday, good sir!

Nice to meet you!

libraryjournal:

chicagopubliclibrary:

“Everyone you will ever meet knows something you don’t.”

Happy birthday, Bill Nye! Born November 27th, 1955.

The Chicago Public Library has a large selection of Bill Nye books. Click here to check out the list.

This is just great life advice. Happy birthday, good sir!

Nice to meet you!

Seeing the source…
HTML -> structure
CSS -> style
tumblr tags -> theme

Seeing the source…

HTML -> structure

CSS -> style

tumblr tags -> theme

"some stories don’t have a clear beginning, middle and end.  life is about not knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it without knowing what’s going to happen next.  delicious ambiguity…"

– gilda radner

(photo: playtime with a broken icepack)

"some stories don’t have a clear beginning, middle and end. life is about not knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it without knowing what’s going to happen next. delicious ambiguity…"

– gilda radner

(photo: playtime with a broken icepack)

Here’s my best shot in trying to attend TEDxSandyHillWomen:
“I am a working chemist at the National Research Council’s Human Health Therapeutics Portfolio and an aspiring librarian with a strong interest for the arts and humanities. My biggest passion in life is to learn from others’ perspectives while constantly reevaluating my own. Much like walking through an art gallery and being confronted by perplexing artworks, it is delightful to discover the world anew from a different angle. In the advent of new technologies and social media, how can we become more engaged with the overwhelming amount of information out there? How can we shape today’s education system to better prepare our children for the future? My various tutoring and volunteering experiences have taught me that true innovations germinate from where one can freely explore opposing ideas and alternatives. As we navigate through the sea of data and misinformation in the 21st century, it is my firm conviction that libraries will play a vital role in helping us to connect the dots over the ever-changing knowledge creation process.”
Regardless of whether I get to attend this TEDx event, this much is clear to me now. Better save up for my MLIS…

Here’s my best shot in trying to attend TEDxSandyHillWomen:

“I am a working chemist at the National Research Council’s Human Health Therapeutics Portfolio and an aspiring librarian with a strong interest for the arts and humanities. My biggest passion in life is to learn from others’ perspectives while constantly reevaluating my own. Much like walking through an art gallery and being confronted by perplexing artworks, it is delightful to discover the world anew from a different angle. In the advent of new technologies and social media, how can we become more engaged with the overwhelming amount of information out there? How can we shape today’s education system to better prepare our children for the future? My various tutoring and volunteering experiences have taught me that true innovations germinate from where one can freely explore opposing ideas and alternatives. As we navigate through the sea of data and misinformation in the 21st century, it is my firm conviction that libraries will play a vital role in helping us to connect the dots over the ever-changing knowledge creation process.”

Regardless of whether I get to attend this TEDx event, this much is clear to me now. Better save up for my MLIS…